Resume & Career Advice

June 6, 2011

Summer Job Strategies

Summer Job

Looking forward to a career this summer?

As summer approaches, you’re probably already thinking about that trip you want to take. You contact people and tag them along to make it more fun! Are you going with your friends or with your family? Then you decide where to go and what to do. Should you go hiking at the Grand Canyon, explore the beaches in Southern California, experience Vegas, or enjoy the theme and water parks in Orlando? After that, you prepare the things you need for the trip—sunscreen, clothes, cash, camera and more cash. Finally, you fly or drive to your destination.

Interestingly, to find a summer job, you must follow pretty much the same steps.

1. Contact your friends and family: Your network is perhaps the most important tool in finding a summer job. Ask them if they know someone from some place that is hiring. Announce on Facebook or Twitter that you’re looking for a job. Update your LinkedIn profile to show your skills and abilities. It helps to be referred in getting a job, and you won’t be referred if you don’t ask your friends.

2. Think about where to go and what to do: Do you want to babysit, wait on tables, or flip burgers? Do you want to be a lifeguard, a camp counselor, or a movie attendant? A lot of businesses boom in the summer. Some company somewhere is going to need the extra help. Frequent campus job fairs or online job sites to get an idea of what’s available. It’s a matter of knowing what you can do, what you want to do, and where to look for a job that might need you.

3. Get ready: Prepare your resume (make sure it’s professional-looking and error-free) and a list of your references (make sure they know you listed them). Practice for the interview with a trusted friend, so that you’ll ace it when you go through the actual thing. It takes work to find work. You won’t find a job by playing Xbox games all day. And no, I’m not saying that you should switch to PlayStation 3.

4. Head on out to your summer adventure: Looking for a summer job is an adventure. Only one out of every 4 job seekers will find work this summer, but don’t give up easily. Remember, you’re a jobseeker. You’re looking for a job, and certainly jobs won’t look for you. You can’t bring your summer getaway to your doorstep. You’ll have to go there yourself. The same goes for a summer job.

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November 29, 2010

Getting the Most of Job Opportunities for Teens

Teenage Jobs

How easy are job opportunities for teens?

If you’re a teenager with little to no work experience, finding a job—and in the process, attempting to beat out college students, retirees and just about every other older person in your city—is strenuous. These tips will help you make it a less stressful journey.

1. Determine what kind of job you want.
At any given point in time—whether the country is in a recession or not—people have always needed someone to wait on tables, flip burgers, operate the cashier, sell merchandise, or just to assist more experienced professionals. Therefore, there will always be job openings. The question is whether it’s right for you, and if you’re the right person for the job. Decide what field you would like to work in—one you would enjoy—to make sure you don’t end up going through the process again in two months. Browse for job advertisements and look at the required credentials. Before applying, find out if your schedule and qualifications are suitable for the position. This would make your job search a lot easier.

2. Prepare the paperwork.
Most jobs that hire teens do not require a resume. A well-written resume, however, will help you stand out from the crowd. Also, check the job postings if the employer has particular requirements, like a social security card, driver’s license, passport, work permit, or a high school transcript or diploma. Also, don’t forget to bring a pen (and a spare one) to the interview. Little things can show your preparedness.

3. Utilize your networks.
Along with the other paperwork, print out your references so you can provide them when asked. Just make sure you inform them in advance. Further, your parents or relatives might know some people from certain companies and could put in a good word for you. They could refer you to a hiring manager or someone else from the inside. You could also ask friends and acquaintances if the organizations they are working for have any openings. You might as well have some use for your 1,000 friends on Facebook.

4. Be persistent.
Finally, show your potential employers that you are determined to get the job. Ask for an interview in a cover letter, send a thank you note after and follow up your application. If a company you give your resume to says that they are not hiring, make sure to present yourself available if an opening comes.

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