Resume & Career Advice

May 2, 2011

Royal Weddings – How Many Jobs Do They Create?

Royal Wedding Jobs

How many jobs does a “royal wedding of the century” create?

The wedding of Prince William of England and Kate Middleton has created a worldwide extravaganza that practically no one could escape. But aside from the feel-good atmosphere it creates in London and elsewhere, the Royal Wedding is also, as one writer calls it, “a Royal Flush for Jobs.” Indeed, lavish events such as the recent Royal Wedding are actually good for the economy.

For one, if you were in Britain, you could have applied for a couple of Royal Wedding Job Vacancies: a coffee room and a wash-up assistant. Locals also had the advantage of possibly being providers of the food, flowers, security, and other event necessities.

Whenever a Royal Wedding takes place, people all around the world typically scramble to produce event-related souvenirs and trinkets, from Royal Wedding commemorative coins, to teabags and refrigerators with the likeness of the Royal Couple. Particularly with the holidays created by such affairs, the tourism industry also gets a jolt. With the influx of well-wishers and spectators who flock to the location to witness the event, travel agencies abroad, as well as local businesses, benefit from the spike in the number of clients.

During Prince William and Kate’s wedding, one woman had an instant dose of fame and employment when she was shortlisted to be a citizen reporter representing USA Today in the Royal Wedding. In fact, the news industry in general would need additional, if temporary, workforce to cover such an event.

Finally, the Royal Wedding created a situation where businesses encountered two successive four-day weekends. A Silicon.com report suggested using the extra down time for system upgrades, patches, or test runs. In retrospect, IT professionals could have offered their expertise to businesses, benefitting both sides.

Royal Weddings are a goldmine for employment and business opportunities. These prospects might not be long-term, but they are plentiful. If nothing else, something like “Ensured timely service to the future King and Queen of England and their 1,900 guests” might just look good on your resume.

March 14, 2011

Does Resume Submission (to Job Databases) Really Work?

Resume Submission

Is there any advantage with submitting your resume to job databases?

Because times are tough and competition in landing jobs are tougher today, job seekers are looking for alternative ways to get their résumés to as much employers as possible— the internet is the most powerful tool in making this happen. Prospective employers and job seekers have now capitalized on the internet technology in announcing job openings and in hopefully landing jobs. The proof of this is only keying in ‘jobs’ in any browser and hundreds of job databases appears on the result. Many of these job databases require job seekers to post their résumés so that possible employers will have access to these applicants. Does this work? Yes.

Although it is true that not many online applicants, particularly those who have submitted their résumés to job databases, are successful enough to have landed jobs or have been contacted by interested employers, many could attest that they have secured a job because of this system. There are credible databases that pass submitted résumés to companies. One consideration of this assertion is that ‘job databases’ are businesses that provide service to job seekers and employers.

The discouraging assumption that résumé submission to job databases does not work comes from the fact that there are too many applicants and only very little employers and/or number of vacant jobs. Also, most of the submitted résumés are not strong enough to be noticed by employers. These types of résumés may have not the correct format. It is very important to understand that electronic résumé submission requires specific format— the scannable format, which uses keywords are intended to match jobs in the databases.

In order to land jobs employing the method of submitting résumés to job databases the format of the résumés must be correct. It is a good career investment to ask for professional help if you are not capable of this.

February 14, 2011

Modern Resumes: Old Practices That Need to Be Left Behind

Resume Strategies: Now and Then

How have job search strategies evolved from traditional to contemporary resumes?

The term “old school” is often viewed in high regard—whether in sports, music or fashion. It mostly allows the older generation to reminisce in fond admiration of the old days, and the younger ones to marvel at the past. This, however, does not work too well in resume writing.

For one, old school resume writing involves buying the best quality paper you can find, and using your Smith Corona typewriter—okay, electronic typewriter—to create your resume. Good luck finding one nowadays. Still, letters typed over whiteout is not the only way your resume would look outdated.

1. Resume writing tips from the 90s allow for the word “Resume” in the beginning, and “References Available Upon Request” in the end. It cannot be stressed enough that people should NOT do that anymore. Everyone knows it’s a resume. Everyone knows your references are available upon request.

2. As late as 2004, some professional resume writers advised job hunters to include street address and fax number as essential to resumes. This is no longer the case. With the current emphasis on privacy, your city and state would suffice. On the other hand, fax machines are so outdated that you might as well just send your resume via pigeons.

3. Further, unless you want hiring managers to envision you as wearing a suit of armor, make sure you include your email address. These days, it’s almost as essential as your name.

4. Contrary to traditional resume rules, abbreviations are okay. Just make sure your audience knows what you’re talking about. To be sure, spell it out the first time you introduce it, then, use abbreviations thereafter. If, for example, you keep on writing “Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer,” it not only wastes space, you would also sound like a toddler who just learned a new word.

There’s nothing wrong with being traditional, but you’d want to stand out from the rest of the applicants in a more flattering manner than to appear like you’re from ancient history.

 

February 7, 2011

Why Health Care Jobs are Most Promising for 2011

Health Care Jobs for 2011

Health Care industry in 2011

Health care jobs are most promising for 2011. According to US News, all of the health care jobs on their list from 2010 are still on their list for this year, in fact with a couple of additions. The health care jobs that are in top careers for 2011 are: Athletic trainer, Dental hygienist, Lab technician, Massage therapist, Occupational therapist, Optometrist, Physician assistant, Physical therapist, Physical therapist assistant, Radiologic technologist, Registered nurse, School psychologist, and Veterinarian.

This 2011, the health care industry can only be expected to grow. New patterns of living also demand new patterns or frequency of certain types of health care services. For instance, Al Lee of PayScale.com observes that “As baby boomers continue to get older, health care needs continue to grow.” This is supported by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, which claim that this trend will increase the demand for home health aides and physical therapists due to the aging population. Similarly, the increasing trend of working at home will also increase the need for home health aides and personal care aides.

The numbers also prove the claims. According to the US BLS, nurses’ jobs will increase by 582,000 or 22% until the 2018; similarly, 460,900 jobs are expected to open up for home health aides; while 378,500 personal and home care aide jobs are up for grabs. An interesting increase is expected or dental hygienists, for which 237,000 more jobs are expected to open up until 2018, marking a 36% growth rate.

And when it comes to salaries, the figures remain competitive for health care jobs as well. For instance, physician assistants earn a median salary of $85,000 while physical therapists’ median salaries are pegged at $70,000; and registered nurses generally earn between $44,000 and $93,000 every year. With the increase in demand for such services, there can only be increase in these numbers as well.

January 31, 2011

Finding and Quitting: 2010 Career Lessons

Career Lessons

Which of the many career lessons of 2010 should you carry on to 2011?

It was the low and the high times, the best and the worst. Series of events happened that with all its varieties, certain lessons have to be learned and remembered in order for us to move forward. The year 2010 has just left us, but what are certain insights that remain?

Lessons for the profession are important to remember and the events regarding career in 2010 will allow us to reflect on what could be done in the new year. Below are news related to career in the past year with valuable lessons to treasure.

•   Mothers who are considering working while having an infant child isn’t such bad idea after all. In July last year, a Columbia University study indicates that mothers or parents basically should not feel guilty having to work while attending to children since it does not have any effects on their performance. Now that seems to be such great news especially when parents have to find a career in order to meet the demands of their children’s needs.

•   Choosing a career carefully is also one of the greatest lessons of all times. In a survey of The Conference Board research group, 45% of the Americans are unsatisfied with their jobs. Relative reasons would include their loss of interest about the job, the stagnant income due to rising inflation and the towering cost of health insurance adds to their burden of having very low take home pay. Showing low interest for a job can be a lesson to job seekers on finding the right career; but the two latter reasons can also be a call for ways on how the economy should be improved so that labor trend can be considered as stable.

•   Relative to the unsatisfied Americans with their job, quitting can be an option but it is also notable that finding a new one is very important. A Business Insider survey says 57% of their 225 participants have quit a job and have still not found another one in the past two years. This is actually depressing especially that today’s economy is experiencing a tough time. As we face 2011, we are faced with the challenge on either staying with our unhappy jobs or just quit.

January 17, 2011

Writing a Résumé for Jobs in the Healthcare Industry

Health Care Jobs

Are you ready for a healthcare job this 2011?

Reliable job-watch and career websites seem to agree that the Healthcare Industry will prove to be an industry of most number of and best employment opportunities in the year 2011. According to AOL Jobs, the top 10 most secure jobs in 2011 are: (1) nurse, (2) physical therapist, (3) pharmacist, (4) physician and surgeon, (5) computer systems analyst and administrator, (6) computer software engineer, (7) biomedical and environmental engineer, (8) accountant, auditor and financial advisor, (9) veterinarian, and 10) lawyer, paralegal and legal assistant. Ranked top are healthcare related jobs. The U.S. News Money Career says that “Healthcare continues to offer excellent opportunities for job seekers, and not only positions that require a medical degree. Occupations that call for fewer years of study and offer more moderate salaries are also in demand”— what could these news mean? Healthcare jobs are in demand this year.

To land a healthcare job requires a résumé that is formatted towards the healthcare industry. Generic résumés will NOT be of much help. It is highly important for an applicant to identify which healthcare job he or she is applying for. Knowing the specific position to apply for is like the guiding line on how to construct the résumé. A doctor’s résumé should not sound like a résumé of a nurse.

Make sure to highlight pertinent professional skills that are required in the healthcare professional. These professional skills and strengths should also be termed in the jargon highly accepted and used within the healthcare industry. Examples of strengths that must be highlighted are: Knowledge of medical terminologies; Nursing Aptitude— Neonatal, Medical Surgical, OR and ER. Use jargons according to relevance. Present background and work experiences that are relevant to positioned being applied for.

For those who are applying for entry-level positions, they should supply educational information first, especially if there are healthcare related, before presenting non-industry related work experience. Entry-level applicants and career changers/shifters may find it very challenging to identify their strengths and experiences that would allow good transition towards the healthcare industry. Professional help is always a good option.

January 10, 2011

How to Increase Your Value While Unemployed

Unemployment

Do you know your best options when facing unemployment?

As tempting as sitting on the couch, watching soap opera reruns and eating microwave popcorn while waiting for calls from prospective employers might be, they’re surely not the best bet to get you out of unemployment.  In fact, your unemployment status might just be the best time for you to increase your value to employers.

The average American stays unemployed for 33 weeks, and unless you do something about it, you could just add “and counting” to that.  When you submit a resume,that eight-month period when you don’t have a job is eye-catching—but not in a good way.  Make sure that that time of inactivity is anything but.

For one, try to find part time or freelance work. Nearly thirty million others do it, so it’s not about the lack of part time jobs.  But even if you are unable to find one, you can also sign up for numerous volunteer work and activities.  Especially when relevant to your skills and qualifications, part time jobs and volunteer work could actually be more than time-passers and resume space-fillers; they could actually convince employers that you want to be productive, and would thus be a valuable employee.

During your “extended vacation” from work, you could also enroll in a few classes or take certain courses that would improve your knowledge. Depending on your industry, there also are certifications and affiliations that would help you advance in your career.  You will probably be hard-pressed to spend on these, but simply consider them investments for your future.  If you are strapped on cash, you could rummage through the web for tutorials to improve your skills.  Take advantage of the time by improving something as simple as your Excel skills, your typing speed, or something else you wouldn’t have time for if you had a full time job.

Also, don’t allow your time off to render yourself obsolete. Keep up with the current trends in the field you belong in by reading industry news, visiting websites, subscribing to blog feeds, or writing blogs yourself.  You wouldn’t want to go to your first interview in almost a year, armed with outdated keywords that would give away your time in the living room.

Finally, use your time unemployed by reconnecting with your networks. Aside from getting news about the prom queen or hearing how your college roommate is doing, you could use your connections to get a job.  After all, eighty percent of jobs are found through networking.  Relying on job postings alone will not remove you from the 9.8%.

In the end, always remember that just because you’re unemployed, doesn’t mean you should be inactive.

November 10, 2010

Projected Highest Paying Jobs for 2011

Employment Opportunities to watch out for in 2011

What types of employment opportunities do we have this 2011?

As 2011 is just around the corner, the Obama administration promises to focus on creating more jobs. The initial impulse is easy: go apply for a job. The hard part is determining what types of jobs to apply for.

People have many reasons why they apply for a particular job—from proximity to their families, to simplicity of the job responsibilities. However, one factor that is not often overlooked is the pay. Here are some of the projected highest-paying jobs for 2011.

As the downward trend of jobs in the goods-producing sector continues, so does the rise in employment opportunities for service providers. It is therefore not surprising to see some of these jobs topping experts’ predictions of the best jobs for 2011.

Systems analysts and database administrators, for example, are expected to see an uptick in job vacancies with their accompanying great pay. They are among the fastest-growing occupations and are also high on the list of the top-paying jobs. Their fellow IT professionals, computer software engineers, similarly never go out of fashion, as the never-ending growth of the internet and technology persists. In fact, engineering seems to be a dependable field entering 2011: with the increasing attention paid to depleting natural resources and green energy, even the need for environmental engineers will likely be stable.

The medical field is still among the best, particularly physician assistants and nurses. These occupations may earn less than doctors (of which, surgeons are the highest paid), but are more in demand.

On the average, these jobs command a salary ranging from $60,000 to $70,000, and their growth is anticipated to be anywhere from 30% to 50%. Considering the average annual salary in the U.S. barely breaks $40,000, and that the predicted job growth in 2011 is at 3.5%, it seems that it does pay to know what you are getting into.

October 4, 2010

Current Employment Trends

Current Trends on Jobs in the U.S.

Do you know the current employment opportunities to tap?

The world has always been dynamic and so is employment. With the Internet age and the tools that empower it, a wide range of new jobs are now available with no need for the degrees of “higher learning” — you can even work while staying at home!

Home-based jobs allow retention in which working parents can perform their duties and childcare responsibilities. The increase in staff motivation is garnered through home-based job as it reduces the level of stress and sickness and lessens commuting time, thus yields to better productivity. Home-based jobs range from telecommuting, technical support, triage, telehealth, online tutoring, telemarketing, medical transcribing, etc. Current trends include high-paying job with low college degrees and extensive requirements. Even if you do not have extensive degrees you can still land a job! These jobs include photography (especially wedding photography wherein the pay is always handsome), tutoring (include arts and music), landscape design, real state, physical trainers, security designing, web design, service technicians, cooking, etc.  Such jobs do not need high educational degrees but gives you the chance of making more money! Green jobs have been on the line too, as it offers work in manufacturing, research and development as well as agriculture. These jobs not only open the door for numerous employment opportunities but also are very much noble for the sustainability of the ecological environment. Think about being on a job while helping transform the environment!

Whether you are looking for a high-paying job without a degree or opting to work while staying at home, the most important thing that you have to remember is that you have to possess the interest in something and that you are willing to work at it with your full potential. The will to learn and to work hard are the key factors that will enable you to be more successful in whatever field you choose. If you research well and are up-to-date with the current employment trends with the right attitude then you can surely hit it big time!

September 28, 2010

Resume vs. CV

The Difference Between Resume and CV

Should you submit a resume or a CV?

Both the resume and the curriculum vitae (CV) are important marketing tools. They are documents containing the most vital information about a person related to his education and job experience needed for employment search. While most people use resume and CV synonymously in the workplace, this two are different. Knowing their differences is important especially in making sure what to use and when to use what.

A curriculum vitae is more thorough than a resume. Resumes are ideally made up of one to two pages only, as employers do not usually have the time to study lengthy documents. Only the information applicable to the job one is applying for should be included in the resume – contact information, relevant education and job experience. In short, a resume is a summary of all your skills and experience needed for the job.

On the other hand, a curriculum vitae is a much more detailed document. As what its name suggests, the CV highlights your educational and academic experiences. It contains not only your past jobs but the special trainings you have undergone, your awards and merits, your affiliations, organizational memberships and scholarly publications you have written, if there are any. You can also put some of your views about your past jobs in your CV, how they have contributed to your personal and professional development.

Employers would just usually ask for a resume but naturally a CV is needed if the work you are applying is more academically or research-inclined. In some countries a CV is needed when applying for academic or research positions or in applying for scholarship grants. The bottom line is, needless of what your potential employer may ask from you, you should write your resume or your CV well to ensure you of getting the job you want.

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